Anna Getty’s Tips For Eating Healthy With Organic Food

Anna Getty healthy eating organic food

Anna Getty, author of Anna Getty’s Easy Green Organic, makes eating healthy simple by sharing her knowledge, secrets and easy tips for maximizing the natural, organic food in your kitchen.

By Anna Getty, Author and LuxEco Adovcate

I have been addicted to organic food for almost 10 years. I know it is better for me, my kids and better for the planet. Studies have shown organic produce to be higher in anti-oxidants; vitamins and minerals (thank you to The Organic Center for your vigilant scientific research) and organic dairy, meat and eggs have fewer hormones, antibiotics and pesticide residues (yes, pesticides are found in meat because cattle are eating feed laden with them). It’s also true that organic farming is more sustainable; it uses fewer resources and encourages community. But above all else it tastes better. Try this experiment. Blindfold your kid and have him taste both a conventional and organic apple. You will see, he will pick the organic apple.

I know, I know, you say, “but organic food is so expensive, so cost prohibitive, and especially in this economy. At the end of the day isn’t it all the same?” I am not sure what is more expensive: organic food that will nourish good health or illness and a lifetime of medical bills, pills and doctor’s visits? In essence I see eating organic food as preventative medicine. That being said here are some ways to cut costs and eat organically that will benefit your family’s health and pocket book.

Prioritize your shopping list. Decide for yourself what is not that important and what you are not willing to compromise. In my opinion staying away from the Dirty Dozen is a good idea.  These crops are the most sprayed. This list includes.

  • Apples
  • Cherries
  • Grapes, imported (Chili)
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Raspberries
  • Strawberries
  • Bell peppers
  • Celery
  • Potatoes
  • Spinach

I would also suggest dairy, meat, eggs and coffee to be on your “must buy organic” list.

Save money on the “it’s okay if it’s not organic” list. Exposure to pesticides will be minimal if any.” This list includes:

  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Bananas
  • Kiwi
  • Mangos
  • Papaya
  • Pineapples
  • Asparagus
  • Avocado
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower

Shop at your local farmer’s market and in season. Buying direct from farmers is always cheaper when you cut out the middleman. And buying strawberries for example (a late spring and summer fruit) in December will always be more expensive then when purchasing in season. Even conventionally grown.

*Tip: purchase berries in season and then freeze them for the off-season, for pies, jams and smoothies.
Find your local farmer’s market at They have a list of over 20,000 farmer’s markets nation wide.

Join a Coop or buying club. Purchasing food with a group of friends or like-minded individuals from a coop that is community run and sells products in bulk is a great way to save money on organic food. For a complete nationwide list go:

I know I am stating the obvious here but nothing is cheaper than your homegrown variety. Grow your own garden. Up until about 50-60 years ago that’s what we did. “I live in a city” you say, become a part of a community garden.

And lastly pick up my book Anna Getty’s Easy Green Organic. The book helps you take the simple steps to reconnecting to your food. We all want to save money, eat good food and be healthy. I wrote this book to help moms and people everywhere do exactly those. It has lots of great green tips to have a healthier, leaner and greener kitchen and 100 recipes that are simple, healthy and tasty and encouraging you to use organic ingredients. Try not to feel overwhelmed. If you want to shop organically do so one step at a time.

Check out one of my favorite recipes from the book to get you started, Simple Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti

Click here for more information on healthy eating, organic food choices and the benefits of leading a natural lifestyle.

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